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Reese and I spent today up in Everett.  The occasion: the Ghost & Goblins girls fast pitch tournament.

The day went ok.  Reese’s 10U Seattle Spice team won its first game 9-3.  Reese walked in her only plate appearance and stole a few bases, including home.  The second two games didn’t go quite as well.  The Spice dropped two games to the Shock team out of Snohomish by a combined score of 21-1 (10-0; 11-1).  Reese struck out in her only plate appearances although, as you can tell by the score, she wasn’t the only one.

A few photos:

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I found this on Facebook today and I thought it worth memorializing for Reese & Finn in perpetuity:

We all want to be successful, but we don’t want to face what’s holding us back. Many of us ignore blind spots, only to fall prey to our shortcomings down the line. So how can we trim the fat, cut our faults to the bone, and get into the habit of success?

Here are 10 toxic habits you need to destroy to allow success to find you:

1. Idolizing those who have already done it.

We all need people to learn from. My concern kicks in when leaders of industry take on a near deity status. I have a huge amount of respect for many of them, but they’re not you. Nobody is living your journey.

Use their experience to help guide you, but nobody has the same path to success. Success has indicators and certain certain patterns, but use the pieces that apply to you and dispel the rest.

2. Comparing yourself to peers.

This past weekend I visited a friend’s summer home. It was larger than my full-time residence. I joked with his wife that I want to be happy for them, but there’s this small part of me that hates them. So, I get it. We all want to have what we don’t have. But there is a time when you need to let go of comparison.

Take that energy and focus on how you can improve your performance as it compares to itself.

3. Rationalizing not trying.

Nothing is worse than saying “if only.” Things are the way they are. Define what you want to change, and go about changing it. If you can’t leave your job because you have to pay your mortgage, I get it. But don’t complain you want to start a business, and say “I wish.”

No more wishing. Stop watching Netflix, or golfing, or going to the Yankees game, and use that time to build your business and break free. Or just shut up about it.

4. Feeding a low opinion of yourself.

I’ve met people who’ve been in one job for years and think they’re destined to be miserable in that role forever. You have the capacity to learn a new skill, and you can jump industries. It will be difficult, but what happens if you never try?

Shake off the fear of the unknown, dispel your self-limiting belief that hugely successful people are more talented than you. They’re just a bit more obsessed.

Become obsessed and make power moves that nobody expects.

5. Pointing fingers.

Nobody is responsible for your good or bad fortune except you. Nobody. Deal with it.

6. Judging others.

Rich people aren’t necessarily entitled. Many of them worked their butts off for what they have. Poor people aren’t lazy, they just don’t know any better, and are stuck.

Get past your judgments, and move forward.

7. Needing to have all the answers.

When confronted with a hard question, the best thing you can say is “I don’t know.” Then go find the answer. You don’t have all the answers, but if you’re smart enough to surround yourself with motivated people who support you, you’ll get the right answer eventually.

8. Seeking perfection.

You will break some eggs on your road to success. Nothing will ever be perfect.

You can strive for greatness, but you can’t lament when you miss the mark.

9. Prioritizing comfort.

Throughout your journey, you will be uncomfortable. You will feel insecure. You will feel self-doubt. You may even feel panicked. Get used to that feeling and keep moving.

Discomfort won’t kill you. But succumbing to self-pity will.

10. Waiting.

There is never a perfect time to start a business, sell a business, or move to the next challenge in your career.

If you feel the need, take the first step. Right now.

Sixth months ago, Reese could barely throw or catch a softball, despite having played for three-plus seasons.

Yesterday she played her first select softball game, as a member of the Seattle Spice 10U squad.

There were lots of hours spent in between — at the park practicing hitting, in the backyard practicing pitching — and the work she’s put in has made a difference.  The passion for the game is there, the improvement has come, and now she’s a “select” player.

I got roped in to serving as official scorer so, unfortunately, this is the only photo I snapped.

Yesterday’s games weren’t particularly memorable.  The Spice won both games — one by an 8-6 count, the other 10-4.  Reese had three plate appearances in the two three-inning games.  Her line: 0-3-0-0 — two walks, a hit by pitch, and three runs scored thanks to lots of wild pitches and stolen bases.  What was memorable, and remarkable, was that she was playing select ball at all.  That she was is a testament to her hard work and dedication.

We could not be more proud.

 

Finn Turns Nine

Star baseball player, up-and-coming golfer, great brother, even greater son.

We got lucky again.

Doin’ the Puyallup

Yesterday the Jenkins fam and our friend Sammie ventured south.  Our destination — the Puyallup Fair, which I think is now known as the Washington State Fair.

It was Reese’s first venture there, my first in thirty-plus years, Finn’s second this week.

A fun day out, but it sure wasn’t cheap.

One thing that you can’t say about Reese: she has a tough life.

Last week I took her, Finn and a bunch of her pals to Wild Waves in Federal Way.

For the last 24 hours she’s been with a mostly different group of gals at Great Wolf Lodge.

I know little about how it went but the mom in charge did send a few cute photos our way:

I’ve long thought our May outing to a Husky softball game was the best outing of the year.

Yesterday was a close second.

Finn and Reese and three of Reese’s pals — Emerson, Sammie and Gracie — and I all joined some other friends for a day out at Wild Waves in Federal Way.

We made a full day out of it.

Left the ‘hood at 9 am; there when the gates opened at 10 am; there until the gates closed at 7 pm; home (after a quick dinner at Taco Time) by 8:30.

Not quite a twelve-hour day, but close.